Tutorial: What is a Virtual-Archive

ReMastered™ Virtual Video™

Einstein: Director of Marking

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THE OLD SCHOOL OF THOUGHT ON ARCHIVING:

"Media deterioration" is the enemy of video data preservation; therefore,

To that end,

A "master" and a "backup" -- a "Static Archive" --

THE PROBLEM WITH STATIC ARCHIVES:

"Technology Shifts" -- not "time" -- is the enemy of MEDIA.

Every Technology Shift

For example DVD discs are going the way of CD discs.

For Example: Video Data:

With ALL the physical technology shifts, video data itself is changing

THE NEW SCHOOL OF THOUGHT ON ARCHIVING:

Archive Technology Shift

In the last 10 years

Virtual Video� Data

An Archive MUST be Virtual, too

That is to say, an Archive must be "Independent of Media".

An Archive must "facilitate" the NEW virtual reality of video data.

An Archive must be able to exist as a

An Archive must be "Strategically Diverse" in video formats

An Archive must be a "Means to Distribute Video" to Others

An Archive must be self-contained in Video Archive Management

IMPORTANT NOTE:

You should always have at least 4 (four) mirror IMAGE™ copies of an archive -- at all time -- for all times to come -- to insure longevity.


We are the only Video Preservation company that has accomplished this challenge for our clients

in our product line marketed as Virtual-Home-Movies™ Video Library.

Recordable DVD Disc (Optical Disc) as an Archive Medium:

The ultimate authorities on the use of Recordable DVD discs as an archive medium is

The following information is a "must read" to protect your home movies:

CONTROLS USDED IN THE NIST/LC OPTICAL DISC LONGEVITY STUDY:

QUALITY CONTROL TESTING CONDITIONS which included

    1. Pre-selection (method unknown) of 5 brands of DVD-R discs
    2. Within each brand, pre-testing and culling of each DVD-R disc to be use in study
    3. Buiding special "recording stations" -- calibrated to match pre-selected discs
    4. Maintaining and Re-calibrating each "recording station" as needed
    5. By a team of Engineers

Testing effects of only 2 aging factors

    1. Humidity Variations and
    2. Temperature Variations
    3. CAUSED NO DISCS TO FAIL

FINDINGS:

The Statistical Model Used showed a high probability of data longevity on the 5 brands of recordable DVD disc to be statistically as high as 45 years (Eyring Statiscical Years) -- only under the "Quality Control Testing Conditions" above.

REACTIONS TO THE NIST/LC STUDY:

  • The Library of Congress (LC) and
  • The National Archives and Record Administration (NARA)

REJECTED THE USE OF RECORDABLE CD/DVD DISCS FOR ARCHIVE PURPOSES.

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN STATISTICS:

September 2007: The NIST / Library of Congress released the Final Report on the Optical Disc Longevity Study.

October 2007: Less that one month later, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) banned the use of recordable optical disc in NARA Departments stating (quotes from newsletter):

    • CDs and DVDs are not an archival storage medium. Do not rely on them to store permanent records.

    • CDs and DVDs are made up of various layers of materials and are subject to physical, mechanical, and chemical changes that may render them unreadable in a relatively short period of time.

    • CD-R/DVD-R have an expected life expectancy of only 2-5 years, far shorter than the published claims of many manufacturers. Test them every 2 years to be sure they are still readable. Unrecorded CDs and DVDs (properly stored) have a useful shelf life of between 5 and 10 years.

The statement above was published as part of NARA's internal newsletter to their own departments.

National Archives: Current Public Advisory:

Recordable (DVD) optical media have widely varying life expectancies. It is not entirely uncommon for some discs to become unreadable in less than 1 year. Relying on recordable discs to last for generations is probably not viable.   

SOURCE: http://www.archives.gov/preservation/formats/video-condition-assessment.html     

Burned (recordable CD-R, DVD-R, BD-R) discs make use of an organic dye layer in order to record data and are typically less reliable because this dye is more susceptible to degradation over time. Recordable CDs, Blu-Rays, and DVDs have proven to be fairly unstable over time, and are deemed a bad choice for long-term preservation.

Source: http://www.archives.gov/preservation/formats/video-important-characteristics.html

MORE SUPPORTING EVIDENCE:

The Relative Stabilities of Optical Disc Formats by Joe Iraci
published in
RESTAURATOR: International Journal for the Preservation of Library and Archive Material Volume 26 - Number 2 - 2005
http://www.uni-muenster.de/Forum-Bestandserhaltung/downloads/iraci.pdf

FINDINGS of RESTAURATOR Report:

The Relative Stabilities of Optical Disc Formats by Joe Iraci
(which I call, "The German / International Study")

Many types and brands were tested, however summary of ONLY DVD-R disc follows:

    • 10 DVD-R discs brands tested -- repeated 4 times for each band -- (40 discs total)
    • using DVD discs available "to general public" -- like you and I use;
    • using DVD recorders available "available to general public" -- like you and I use.

DVD-R DISC RESULTS:

    • 8% DVD-R discs survived (statistically 1 out of 12 discs survived) --
    • Looking at this statistic another way, 92% died (on average 11 DVD discs out or every 12 died) "dead as a hammer" -- to paraphrase the "techno-talk!"

DVD-RW DISC RESULTS: 100% of all CD/DVD RW type discs failed -- "dead as a hammer".

THE METHOD OF TESTING: "Off-the-shelf" discs were subjected to Eyring Aging Model.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Iraci Study specifically did NOT express aging in terms of years -- stating that it was inappropriate to attempt to do so. This is a another major difference bettween the Iraci study and the NIST/LC Study.

THE BIG DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE 2 STUDIES:

The Method of Testing!

SUGGESTED READING: Lies, Darn Lies, and Statistics